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A Place Called Winter

With his new novel A Place Called Winter, bestselling English novelist Patrick Gale tells the story of a man called Harry who is forced to leave his wife and child in Edwardian England for the wilds of the Canadian prairies. Based loosely on the true story of a family member, this is Gale's first hi

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Life Lessons

Celebrated memoirist Drusilla Modjeska continues the story of her life with Second Half First, a look back at the last 30 years and how they have shaped her. Join her in conversation with Beth Yahp, who has recently published Eat First, Talk Later; an account of returning to Malaysia with her parent

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One Life

Kate Grenville returns to the festival with One Life: My Mother’s Story. In her incredible book, Grenville imagines her mother’s life using the fragments of a memoir she left behind. Told with Grenville’s gift for story, this book is a generous account of a life told by her deeply sympathetic

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On Memory

In his novel A Cure for Suicide, Jesse Ball tells the story of a man who must start his life over without memories. In Laura van den Berg’s Find Me, a woman discovers she is immune to a disease that is destroying people’s memories. In The Chimes, Anna Smaill creates a world without a past contro

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Legacy

In her memoir Reckoning, Magda Szubanski tells the story of her life and that of her father, who fought with the Polish resistance during the Second World War. In her novel The Waiting Room, Leah Kaminsky tells the story of a woman born to Holocaust survivors in Melbourne, now living in Haifa, Israe

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The Water Knife

Bestselling science fiction writer Paolo Bacigalupi takes us deep into the water wars in the American West with this thrilling new novel, The Water Knife. When a rumour about a new source of water surfaces, Angel Velasquez is sent to investigate, but what he finds is a gruesome series of murders and

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Still Alice

Best known for her bestselling novel Still Alice, acclaimed writer and neuroscientist Lisa Genova comes to the festival with her new novel Inside the O’Briens. The novel tells the story of a family struggling with Huntington’s disease – the lethal neurodegenerative disease with no treatment an

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The Map of Time

Acclaimed as one of the most original storytellers of our time, Félix J Palma comes to Adelaide with the final volume in his bestselling series, The Map of Time. With The Map of Chaos, Palma returns to Victorian England where H G Wells finds himself in an epic adventure confronting the Invisible Ma

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Live Streaming in Your Library

Adelaide Writers’ Week has always been a community event, and in 2016, for the very first time, East Stage sessions the opening weekend will be available to live stream at your local library. We are thrilled to present two days of Writers’ Week for readers and writers around the state. Head t

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Artist Bar

The perfect spot for post-show rumination, come on down to The Bistro at the Adelaide Festival Centre after your show. With your soul properly fed, grab a drink or something to eat while Adelaide Festival audiences, artists and our crack team of DJs keep your company. If you're a Friend or Patron of

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On Family

In Caroline Baum’s Only and Catherine de Saint Phalle’s Poum and Alexandre we are introduced to European families in the aftermath of the Second World War. Both memoirs are told by lonely children growing up with eccentric parents traumatised by the war. Both explore the melancholy running benea

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The Restorer

With his new novel, The Restorer, award-wining novelist Michael Sala explores a faltering marriage hoping for a second chance. Set in a derelict house by the sea, the novel tells the story of a husband dedicated to salvaging the house, and his wife who is at first, hopeful, while their daughter rema

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The Real Jane Austen

Join celebrated biographer Paul Byrne for a talk about beloved literary figure Jane Austen. Byrne is the author of a number of books on Jane Austen including The Real Jane Austen an The Genius of Jane Austen. Her talk will cover both the objects that illuminated Austen’s life as well as her long r

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Position Doubtful

For over twenty years Kim Mahood has been driving her ute from Canberra to a trace of land that stretches from the Tanami Desert to the East Kimberley. This journey is one that takes her back to the station where she was born, one that has been returned to the traditional owners. Mahood is a visual

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Little Girls

In Anna George’s poignant novel The Lone Child, an affluent woman saves a little girl she encounters on the beach. In her harrowing novel, The Choke, Sofie Laguna tells the story of a little girl abandoned to a world she cannot hope to understand. Both novels explore notions of class, violence, l

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Friends

In his new novel, The Sparsholt Affair, Alan Hollinghurst tells the story of a group of friends, mostly gay men, whose lives have been affected in some way by the charming David Sparsholt. Sarah Winman’s novel Tin Man, tells the story of three friends and two great loves. Both of these exquisite n

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The Memory Game

In her found novel, The Beat of the Pendulum, Catherine Chidgey chronicles a year of her life through the language she encountered daily. In Goodbye, Vitamin, Rachel Khong tells the story of a young woman who returns home to help care for her father, recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. In very di

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Dark Heart

In Ceridwen Dovey’s novel In the Garden of the Fugitives , two people are united after a 20-year silence, he a wealthy benefactor, and she his one-time young protégé. In Lawrence Osborne’s novel Beautiful Animals, two women discover a Syrian refugee washed up on a Greek Island. Join these two

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Blind Spot

Teju Cole is a writer, art historian and photographer. His fiction includes the novella Every Day is for the Thief and the award-winning novel Open City. He is the author of the essay collection Known and Strange Things and most recently he has published Blind Spot, a book of photographs and accom

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Salt Fat Acid Heat

Chef and writer, Samin Nosrat, is a gifted teacher. Her students have included kids, teenagers and the celebrated food writer Michael Pollan. A former Chez Panisse cook, Nosrat comes to Adelaide with her revolutionary cookbook, Salt Fat Acid Heat. After listening to her talk about food movements, go

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Lost Things

In Bernice Chauly’s novel Once We Were There a journalist find herself in the Reformasi movement in Kuala Lumpur. In her novel The Life to Come, Michelle de Kretser explores a community scattered from Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka. In Ghachar Ghochar, Vivek Shanbhag tells the story of family in Bang

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Brain Food

There are few adages as familiar as ‘you are what you eat’ and in their new book Maggie’s Recipe for Life, the celebrated cook teams up with an Alzheimer’s researcher, Professor Ralph Martins, to explore why diet matters and how it can be both healthy and delicious. No matter your stage of l

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Invented Histories

This session brings together two writers who have taken moments in Australian history and imagined them into stories of blood, bonds and memory. In Storyland Catherine McKinnon connects Flinders’ voyage to Illawarra to a 19th century farm and then well into the future. In From the Wreck, Jane Raws

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American South

From the rich tradition that is Southern literature come writers exploring different aspects of the American South. With Darktown and Lightning Men, Thomas Mullen writes crime novels set in the Atlanta during Jim Crow. While with The Fighter and Desperation Road, Michael Farris Smith explores the ha

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Adelaide Festival Awards

The winners of the 2018 Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature will be announced including Fiction, Children’s Literature, Non-Fiction, Young Adult Fiction, John Bray Poetry and Premier’s awards. The state winners of the Jill Blewett Playwright’s award and the Wakefield Press Unpublished Manu

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Small Towns

In Wimmera Mark Brandi tells the story of two boys growing up in a small town that harbours a secret. In The Ruin, Dervla McTiernan’s small town is in Ireland, where a young doctor’s partner is found in a frozen river: an apparent suicide. Join them for a conversation about the uniquely sinister

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War & Peace

In his memoir, Balcony Over Jerusalem, John Lyons chronicles the six years he lived in Israel and in doing so offers a scathing account of the region’s treatment of the Palestinians. In her book, Draw Your Weapons, Sarah Sentilles explores her response to photographs of Abu Ghraib. Together these

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Saga Land

Richard Fidler and Kári Gíslason are good friends who share a passion for the sagas of Iceland. Filled with the rough and tumble of the Middle Ages – blood feuds, fearless women, murder – the sagas are amongst our greatest stories. This fascination takes Fidler and Gíslason on an epic journe

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A Hundred Small Lessons

Ashley Hay is the author of the novels, The Body in the Clouds, The Railwayman’s Wife and most recently A Hundred Small Lessons. This new novel takes place over a single hot summer in Brisbane. It tells the story of two women and a single house. Beautifully observed, it is about the moments and me

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Glass Houses

Louise Penny is the author of the best-selling Armand Gamache novels. Her most recent Glass Houses, sees Gamache’s tiny village under a threat which begins as a cloaked man takes up silent residence in the village green. While in Montreal, Gamache is giving witness at what may be the trial that en

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The Animals

Three writers explore the relationship between humans and animals. In Ceridwen Dovey’s collection Only the Animals, the souls of ten animals tell their story. In Eva Hornung’s The Last Garden a boy cohabits with horses and chooks after the loss of his parents. In Fiona McFarlane’s The Night G

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Murder/Memoir

With The Fact of a Body, lawyer turned writer Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich has written an utterly compelling account of her experience of a death row case and its retrial. In part what makes this book so extraordinary are the painful memories of her childhood that butt up against the fate of a convi

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Goodbye, Vitamin

In Rachel Khong’s stunning debut novel, Goodbye, Vitamin, a young woman, Ruth, returns home to help her mother care for her father, recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Written as a diary, Ruth’s account sits against one she finds written by her father as he chronicled her early life. Together

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Home Fire

With her new novel Home Fire, Kamila Shamsie has created a haunting re-telling of Antigone. Her Antigone is Aneeka, a Muslim girl living in London. When she and her twin discover their father died while en route to Guantanamo, her brother leaves to pursue his own dream and to prove himself to the d

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Free Speech in a Chinese World

In 2017 the international media was full of stories about the spread beyond China’s borders of the Communist Party’s campaign against free speech. Clive Hamilton became a victim of it when his book examining the influence of the Chinese government in Australia was dropped by his publisher for fe

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Kinds of Madness

In Alexander Maksik’s novel Shelter in Place a young man begins to suffer the symptoms of bipolar disorder after his mother kills a man with a hammer. In Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin a woman lies in a hospital bed telling a young boy a story that sounds like a dream. In both the characters are

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This Book Changed My Life

We all have a book that we love but for writers that relationship can be that much more complicated. This session brings together novelist and short story writer Rebekah Clarkson, Miles Franklin winning novelist and children’s writer Sofie Laguna, and children’s book writer Wendy Orr for a conve

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Words & Images

Writer and photographer Teju Cole has written widely on photography, politics and his own experiences, most recently in Blind Spot. Sarah Sentilles is a writer and theologian who in Draw Your Weapons weaves together a story that consider photography, Abu Ghraib, and peace. Join two of our most origi

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Boat People

In her novel No More Boats, Felicity Castagna explores the tensions surrounding new refugees through an Italian migrant, convinced he can help stop the boats. In the novel The Life to Come, Michelle de Kretser explores the stories we tell about ourselves and the ways we invent both the past and the

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Middle East Memoir

Award-winning journalist John Lyons spent six years covering the Middle East. One result is his memoir Balcony Over Jerusalem, an account of both life with his wife and son as well as a searing indictment of 50 years of Israeli occupation of the West Bank. His book is a wonderful blend of the deligh

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Democracy and Its Crisis

Prompted by Brexit and the US election, A. C. Grayling considered why the institutions of democracy are seemingly unable to protect themselves. The result is Democracy and Its Crisis, where Grayling looks at history in an effort to make sense of today’s threats to representational democracy. Compe

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Detours

In his memoir Detours, Tim Rogers writes with grace and insight as he explores the complicated man that he is – and in this account the emphasis is on the man almost more than the musician. That said, this is a book about a musician, so there is a dark journey here – drink, fights and real regre

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Tin Man

The author of When God Was A Rabbit and A Year of Marvellous Ways has recently published Tin Man, an exquisite love story about two boys and a girl. At the heart of the novel are the childhood friends and one-time lovers Ellis and Michael. As the novel opens we meet the widowed Ellis looking back, l

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Democracy and Populism

In Democracy and its Crisis AC Grayling makes a compelling case for why the institutions of representative democracy are seemingly unable to cope with rise of populism. With Australia’s Second Chance George Megalogenis makes a case for how Australia will survive the era of Trump. Join them for a w

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Missing Up

Written over three years, Pam Brown’s new collection of poems Missing Up is a reflection on the absurdities of materialism, one that begins in the everyday – a fridge, a bus stop, surf music on the radio. Witty, urbane and optimistic her collection is lyrical, political and a formidable read.

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Draw Your Weapons

Sarah Sentilles’ extraordinary book Draw Your Weapons is a meditation on war, peace, art history, photography, violence and faith. It tells the story of two men, one a conscientious objector from World War II and the second a soldier who served at Abu Ghraib. Through these stories and others, she

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Poet First, Then…

Both Patricia Lockwood and Ashleigh Young began their writing lives as poets. Both have produced terrific books of non-fiction, for Lockwood a memoir Priestdaddy and for Young a collection of essays, Can You Tolerate This?. The former is an often-hilarious account of Lockwood’s return to live wi

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Making History

In See What Have I Done, Sarah Schmidt offers a thrilling new look at Lizzie Borden, a young woman famously charged with murder in 1892. In Darktown and Lightning Men Thomas Mullen creates two ‘Negro Officers’ negotiating the fierce restrictions of Jim Crow laws in 1950s Atlanta. Join these two

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Dedication

For over 34 years, children have been reading Mem Fox’s iconic creation Possum Magic. Today, Mem Fox is the award-winning author of over 40 books, most recently I’m Australian Too. In addition to her writing, Fox is a long-time advocate for literacy.

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Beautiful Animals

Lawrence Osborne has been described as a modern Graham Greene. His novels are set in exotic locations and tell the stories of wealthy white Europeans trapped in difficult circumstances often of their own making. His novels include The Forgiven, The Ballad of a Small Player, Hunters in the Dark and m

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Honorary Wombat

Jackie French is an award-winning writer for children and adults of all ages. She is an historian, ecologist and honorary wombat. Her many award-winning books include Diary of a Wombat, A Waltz for Matilda, and Pennies for Hitler. She comes to the Festival with her the most recent books Facing the F

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Desperation Road

Michael Farris Smith is the award-winning author of the novels Desperation Road, Rivers, and most recently The Fighter. What his books share is the broken down landscape of the American South, the hardscrabble lives of its inhabitants and the inevitable violence of its men. Described at times as a S

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MUD Club Prize

The MUD Club is an Adelaide-based philanthropic group who raise money to send Australian writers to literary festivals including Adelaide Writers’ Week. This new venture, the MUD Literary Prize is a prize for a debut novel by an Australian writer. The aim of the prize to is both celebrate and enco

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Strange Houses

In Fever Dreams Samanta Schweblin’s first novel to appear in English, a woman in hospital tells the story of a fantastical encounter with a neighbour. In Fiona McFarlane’s The Night Guest an elderly woman believes there is a tiger in her house. In both novels the women are unsure what to believe

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Dust Devils

Cory Doctorow’s novel Walkaway is about tribes of people who attempt to walk away from society. Jennifer Mills’ novel, Dyschronia is about a town that awakes to find the sea has disappeared. Maja Lunde’s The History of Bees is a novel that chronicles a history of beekeeping. Join them for a co

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Into the Woods

Beware what lurks in isolated places. Dervla McTiernan’s The Ruin tells the story of a suspicious suicide and a twenty-year-old overdose in country Ireland. In Louise Penny’s Glass Houses, a hooded figure takes up residence in Chief Superintendent Gamache’s home village in Quebec. Join them f

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The Life to Come

With her first novel since her Miles Franklin winning Questions of Travel, Michelle de Kretser returns to Adelaide with The Life To Come. Set in Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka, this new novel is about history, houses, and the stories we tell ourselves. Told through a handful of characters, the novel is

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The Sparsholt Affair

From wartime Oxford to today’s London Alan Hollinghurst’s new novel, The Sparsholt Affair tells the story of a group of friends, mostly gay men, who have some connection to the charming David Sparsholt. Told in five parts, the novel tells the story of three generations of Sparsholts, and hinges

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The Burbs

This session brings together two writers who explore the twilight world of the suburb. In Barking Dogs, Rebekah Clarkson offers a wry and often intimate look at a regional town in transformation. In Australia Day, Melanie Cheng explores a richly diverse group of characters, all longing to belong. Jo

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Darktown

Thomas Mullen has written about the flu epidemic, dystopian futures and Depression era bank robbers. But most recently he has been writing about the Jim Crow Atlanta and the story of two black men new to the police force. The books Darktown and Lightning Men are both crime novels and a startling exa

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The Self in the Story

Some of today’s most inventive new writing is nonfiction with the writer in the story. Sometimes that presence is largely as an observer as in Sarah Krasnostein’s The Trauma Cleaner, or it can be more intimate as in Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s The Fact of a Body or Ashleigh Young’s Can Yo

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Writing Globally

Barbara Kingsolver has been called one of the most important writers of the 20th century. Her many books include The Poisonwood Bible, Prodigal Summer, The Lacuna and most recently Flight Behaviour. Her experiences from living all over the world have informed her writings as has her deep commitment

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Faulty Pilgrims

Iranian born American Laleh Khadivi is the author of an incredible trilogy of novels that include The Age of Orphans, The Walking and A Good Country. Together the novels tell the story of three generations of Kurdish Iranian men coming-of-age. The last of these is a young man growing up in Californi

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Ghachar Ghochar

Vivek Shanbhag is one of India’s most celebrated writers, and with the translation of his novel Ghachar Ghochar we can now read him in English. His brilliant novel tells the story of a poor family who experience sudden wealth, only to discover that wealth is not always as it seems. Join him in con

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Whipbird

Set at a winery in Victoria, Robert Drewe’s new novel, Whipbird, tells the story of the Cleary family. The event is a family reunion celebrating 160 years since the arrival of the first Irish relation – think grievances and grog. Wonderfully satiric and epic in scope, the novel has great fun wi

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On Bees & Birds

One time metaphor for sex, the birds and bees are increasingly a harbinger of doom. In Harriet McKnight’s novel Rain Birds, two women in a remote community find themselves at odds over a flock of cockatoos. In Maja Lunde’s novel The History of Bees, a century of beekeepers is lost to the future.

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Berlin Stories

Catherine Chidgey’s novel The Wish Child tells the story of two families living in Hitler’s Germany. Told by children, the novel explores the war from behind the domestic curtain of those trying to survive. David Foenkinos’ Charlotte is an imaginary biography-as-novel of Charlotte Salomon, a

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My sister Rosa

Author of Liar, Zombies vs. Unicorns and How to Ditch Your Fairy, Justine Larbalestier’s most recent novel is My Sister Rosa, a chilling story about seventeen-year-old Che and his psychopathic younger sister Rosa. By turns a reflection on morality, faith, identity and race, the novel is a riveting

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Poetry reading

Each year Adelaide Writers’ Week hosts a poetry reading with Peter Goldsworthy. The event is intended to pay homage to the event’s long association with poets and to celebrate contemporary poetry. This year’s poets include Alison Flett, Nelson Hedditch, Rachael Mead, Manal Younus and Rob Walk

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Craphound

Cory Doctorow is a science fiction writer, journalist, blogger, creative commons activist and co-editor of Boing Boing. His most recent books are the YA novels Walkaway and Homeland, the adult novel In Real Life, and the nonfiction business book Information Doesn’t Want To Be Free. Join him for a

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Moorehead

In the not too distant past Alan Moorehead was a famous Australian writer, an inspiration to Robert Hughes and Clive James, a war reporter who wrote bestselling histories. And then he disappeared. Thornton McCamish is the author of Our Man Elsewhere: In Search of Alan Moorehead, a must read for thos

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Mr Deakin

As he emerges in Judith Brett’s biography, The Enigmatic Mr Deakin, Australia’s second Prime Minister was solitary and religious; he found the business of politics distasteful yet he made it his life’s work. Brett’s biography sheds new light on the gifted man who helped create modern Austral

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The Hazards

Sarah Holland-Batt is quickly becoming one of the most important poets of her generation. Her collections to date include the award-winning Aria and more recently The Hazards. Her often-haunting poems take up subjects as diverse as history, art and haunted landscapes here in Australia and around the

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Charlotte

David Foenkinos is a writer and scriptwriter whose novels in English include Delicacy, and the Prix Renaudot winning Charlotte. Charlotte is a heartbreaking account of the life of German Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon, who was killed at 26 while pregnant at Auschwitz, leaving behind over 700 painti

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Homegrown

Among the great fears of contemporary culture is that of the homegrown terrorist. In both Laleh Khadivi’s A Good Country and in Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire, young Muslim men are radicalised, the former in California the later in London. Both are good boys, both have families determined to protect

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Shelter in Place

Alexander Maksik is the author of You Deserve Nothing, A Marker to Measure Drift, and most recently Shelter in Place. In this new novel Maksik tells the story of a young man, whose life explodes as his mother beats a stranger to death with a hammer. Join him for a conversation about love, memory, m

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Priestdaddy

When poet Patricia Lockwood and her husband went, by necessity, to live with her parents, they returned to the Church. Lockwood’s father is a Lutheran priest converted to Catholicism, and Lockwood’s chronicle of the year they spent together is insanely funny and brilliantly observed. This unspar

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Taboo

Kim Scott is the author of the Miles Franklin winning novels Benang and That Deadman Dance. With Taboo, he remains in Noongar country. Set in the present, Taboo tells the story of a group of Noongar people who return to the site of a massacre for the opening of a ‘Peace Park’.

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Seeking Refuge

In Claire G Coleman’s novel Terra Nullius, she creates a world where the Settlers are eager to settle the savages. In Jane Rawson’s From the Wreck a mysterious creature survives the 1859 sinking of the Admella and attaches herself to a young boy. Join them for a conversation about how the fantas

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Natural Wonders

In Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life Peter Godfrey-Smith considers what we can learn from one of earth’s most remarkable creatures. In The Wonder of Birds Jim Robbins examines our unique relationship with these wild creatures and what it is birds bring to us and the pl

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Call of the Reed Warbler

With Call of the Reed Warbler, farmer and writer Charles Massy is calling for a new way of farming and growing food. His is a personal story, one that sees a chemical-using farmer transformed into a radical-ecologist farmer. Part memoir, part exposé of industrial agriculture, Massy’s book is a ca

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The Griffith Review - Commonwealth Now

With the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in April, the Griffith Review brings together a host of writers to consider the future of the Commonwealth. This session features biographer Judith Brett on Deakin, novelist and poet Bernice Chauly on the Batang Kali massacre and writer and researcher Gr

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Robert Dessaix

Days are to be happy in, not just to fill with work. In The Pleasures of Leisure Robert Dessaix invites us to think imaginatively about how we spend our free time - and how to get more of it. Join him for a stimulating and thoughtful conversation about dog-walking, travel, hang-gliding, reading an

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Miss Muriel Matters

Born in the Adelaide suburb of Bowden and educated at the University of Adelaide, Muriel Matters later became one of London’s most famous suffragists. Her career highlights include chaining herself to the British House of Commons, a stint in Holloway Prison and a tour of England in a horse-drawn c

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Mr Showbiz

Stephen Dando-Collins’ Mr Showbiz tells the story of Robert Stigwood . Born in Port Pirie, Stigwood left Adelaide for the UK in the 1950s and by the 1970s was managing the careers of the Bee Gees, Cream, Eric Clapton and went on to produce films including Gallipoli, Saturday Night Fever and Grease

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The Vandemonian War

Nick Brodie is a writer and historian. He is the author of 1787: The Lost Chapters of Australia’s Beginnings. More recently he has published The Vandemonian War, an account of the largely untold story of how the British colonial government occupied Van Diemen’s Land by deploying regimental soldi

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The Trauma Cleaner

The subtitle of Sarah Krasnostein’s brilliant book The Trauma Cleaner about Sandra Pankhurst reads One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in Death, Decay & Disaster. The title could go on to add – husband and father, drag queen, gender reassignment patient, sex worker, small businesswoman, trophy wif

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Anaesthesia

One of the most astonishing facts in Kate Cole-Adams Anaesthesia, is that doctors don’t actually know how anaesthetics works. Cole-Adams book is a fascinating mix of reporting, medical history, philosophy and memoir. At its heart is the idea of consciousness not only under anesthesia but in our ev

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How to Fall in Love

Mandy Len Catron’s essay To Fall in Love with Anyone, Do This was one of the most read articles in the New York Times in 2015. It lead to two TED Talks and her recent book How To Fall in Love with Anyone: A Memoir in Essays. Catron examines the power of romantic myths and their real life implicati

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Lost in Time

Eva Hornung’s novel The Last Garden tells the story of a young man living in a community in exile whose father kills his wife and then himself, and the young man’s subsequent experience of grief. In Jennifer Mills’ novel Dyschronia an isolated seaside community awakes to find the sea has disap

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Woman of Substances

Across the developed world substance use among women is on the rise, and in Woman of Substances, Jenny Valentish explores women’s addiction and how those experiences are different from men’s. Drawing on neuroscience, she explains why other self-destructive behaviours – eating disorders, compul

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Other Minds

With Other Minds: the Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life, philosopher and scuba diver Peter Godfrey-Smith invites us to consider the octopus, one of earth’s most intelligent creatures. By comparing us to one of our most remarkable animal relatives, Godfrey-Smith sheds new light on both

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Beyond the Veil

In 2011 Manal al-Sharif was jailed for driving a car in Saudi Arabia. Her memoir, Daring to Drive, is account of her arrest and her political campaign. Australian-born Amal Awad set out to explore the lives of Arab women in Australia and the Middle East, the result was Beyond Veiled Clichés. Join

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The Wonder of Birds

Birds are everywhere. We watch them, keep them as pets, we even talk to them. For generations they have helped us as we learned to fly, they provide us with food and clothing and they help us understand the human brain, body and mind. With The Wonder of Birds, Jim Robbins invites us into the realm

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What is Lost

In Sarah Holland-Batt’s collection The Hazards we encounter a convict transported to Botany Bay, six men lost in the Mekong, a bestiary and a lost love. In Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner’s collection Iep Jaltok we encounter voices protesting colonialism, a rising sea, American nuclear testing. Join these

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Danger Music

In 2014 Emma Ayres was depressed and so quit radio and embarked on a surprising path to salvation – teaching cello to orphans and street kids in Kabul. His memoir Danger Music chronicles Ayres’ chaotic joy of teaching Afghan children and her eventual decision to return to Australia to begin tran

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Love and Tartan

Alexander McCall Smith, one of the world’s most beloved and prolific writers returns to Adelaide with three new books. Join him for conversation about misadventures in Italy with My Italian Bulldozer, join Pat Macgregor at the Elephant House in A Time of Love and Tartan and the spend some time wi

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Caroline Chisholm

With her recently biography, Caroline Chisholm: An Irresistible Force, Sarah Goldman tells the story of one of Australia’s most charismatic and influential women. Caroline Chisholm arrived in Australia in 1838 and was appalled by the plight of young female immigrants. She took up their cause and a

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Fragrance

While on a book tour in 2015 Kate Grenville was dogged by ill-health. The culprit was eventually discovered to be artificial fragrance. Her new book, The Case Against Fragrance, is both a memoir and a fascinating exploration of the chemicals in perfumes, cosmetics, even cleansers. In a world increas

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South of Darkness

John Marsden is an award-winning writer for both children and adults, as well as an educator. He is the author of the hugely successful Tomorrow series along with more than 40 other titles. He comes to the Festival with South of Darkness, a novel for adults, that tells the story of 13-year-old Barna

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Invisible Mending

Poet and broadcaster Mike Ladd has recently published the collection Invisible Mending. A mash-up of poetry, essay, memoir and short story, the book takes up the idea of scarring and healing. As in his earlier work, Ladd explores themes of family connections, landscape and travel. His earlier collec

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Only

Caroline Baum returns to the festival with her memoir Only, a brilliant portrait of her own life as an only child with parents who were charismatic, damaged and displaced. Hers is an account of what it means to be a good daughter. It is also a love letter to Europe and the terrible legacies of war

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Gender Benders

Cordelia Fine is an academic psychologist who writes about neuroscience and psychology. With Delusions of Gender she established herself as a great demystifier. Most recently Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of our Gendered Minds takes on “nature vs nurture”, wittily breaking through the mir

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Dedication

It is not an exaggeration to call Elizabeth Harrower a titan of 20th century letters. She is the author of the novels Down in the City, The Long Prospect, The Catherine Wheel, The Watch Tower and In Certain Circles. Her work was first published in the early 1960s and by 1977 she had given up writin

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The Nix

The Nix tells the story of Samuel Andresen- Anderson, a washed up writer whose mother disappeared when he was a child, only to reappear decades later in need of help after hurling a rock at a politician. At times fiercely funny The Nix is a story about the force of family in politically turbulent ti

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Invisible Histories

Sometimes when thinking about history, the best place to go is fiction. This session brings together two novelists who explore historic moments in the most unexpected ways. In Armando Lucas Correa’s The German Girl, a lost moment of Cuba’s role in the World War II is recovered. In his novel The

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How to Explain

This session brings together three children’s writers for a conversation about how we help children navigate sophisticated ideas. Davina Bell’s The Underwater Fancy-Dress Parade is a tender tale about an anxious boy. Elin Kelsey’s You Are Stardust magically reconnects us to the natural world,

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Kick

Celebrated biographer Paula Byrne comes to Adelaide with a biography of Kick Kennedy, JFK’s younger sister. Kick is a story of vivacious young women coming of age in a circle that included the Devonshires, the Churchills, the Astors and the Mitfords. Kick’s world was a social whirl, one that end

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Wisdom Tree

Nick Earls is one of Australia’s most fascinating fiction writers, who writes long and short form books for both adults and children. He comes to the Festival with a wonderful collection of novellas called Wisdom Tree. Each of the five books takes a city as its reference point, and each tells a st

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Adelaide Writers' Week 2016

Welcome to Adelaide Writers' Week 2016! Download the daily planner, the entire PDF program, or browse by day or author below. table, th, td { padding: 5px; } Kick off Adelaide Writers’ Week with a day featuring some of contemporary literature’s finest fiction writers. And once

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The Way to the Spring

Ben Ehrenreich spent three years travelling to the West Bank and living with Palestinian families. The result is the utterly extraordinary The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine, a book that reflects the bravery of a people who live under occupation, but who continue to live. These are s

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True Girt

With Girt and True Girt, David Hunt has become the funny man of Australian history- which is not to say the books aren’t proper history. Together his award-winning books take readers from first contact to the Wild South to the death of Ned Kelly. The books are hilarious, insightful, unexpected and

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The Age of Jihad

Patrick Cockburn, a Middle East correspondent for more than two decades, was the first Western journalist to warn about the dangers of the Islamic State. Fifteen years after the US invasion of Afghanistan he brings us an important new book, The Age of Jihad. Join him for a conversation about the Sun

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True Crime

For Hannah Kent, mining little known histories has made for two insanely successful novels, Burial Rites and The Good People. For Graeme Macrae Burnet, creating an historical world has made for his best-selling novel His Bloody Project, one that tells the story of a brutal murder. Join these two wri

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The Last Hundred Years

Jane Smiley once set herself the task of writing fiction across every genre, including a trilogy. The Last Hundred Years: A Family Saga is just that. With these novels Smiley has returned to Iowa to tell the story of a family over three tumultuous generations. What is extraordinary is that each chap

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Wintering

Peter Geye’s novel Wintering follows on from its predecessor The Lighthouse Road, which introduces a fractured family through a young Norwegian woman and her bastard child born of a rape. Set in the wilds of Minnesota these novels tell the story of fathers, former spouses and their sons living in

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The German Girl

Celebrated Cuban journalist Armando Lucas Correa has recently published his first novel The German Girl. The novel tells the real-life story of a group of Jewish refugees who set sail from Berlin in the hopes of finding refuge in Cuba. By the time the boat arrives all but a handful were turned away.

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American Dreaming

Poet Adam Fitzgerald’s George Washington is a collection that takes us to New Jersey and the popular culture of the 1990s. Nathan Hill’s novel The Nix tells the story of a young man looking back to the 1960s. Both books wrangle with culture, loss, love, and resilience in the face of change. The

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Curiosity

Novelist, editor, translator and essayist Alberto Manguel is among the most celebrated of our contemporary thinkers. He has written widely on books and reading, and comes to the Festival with a history of curiosity. In each chapter Manguel has selected a writer or thinker who found a new way to ask

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Small Towns

Small towns are never what they appear; there is always something dodgy going on and this session brings together the creators of two Australian towns. In Cassandra Austin’s All Fall Down, a bridge collapses and a young girl is punished with a trip to live with her uncle. In Holly Throsby’s Good

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Kids' Weekend

The Adelaide Writers' Week Kids’ Weekend returns with two big days of stories, painting, printing, parades and a giant mouse. Join us for some full-on fun! Maisy Mouse Maisy Mouse returns to Kids’ Weekend and this time she is bringing along her creator Lucy Cousins for a kids only mural maki

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The Sadness of History

This session brings together two novelists exploring the realities of displaced peoples. Krys Lee’s How I Became A North Korean tells the story of two young defectors and a young American Korean boy fighting to stay alive in a border town in China. A S Patric’s Miles Franklin Award-winning Black

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Ordinary People

So much of life is made up of enduring quiet disappointments. Michelle Wright’s remarkable collection of stories, Fine, captures the complex and often painful moments that define us. Nick Earls’ novellas, Wisdom Tree, explore the relationships that shape us, be they familial or not. Join these t

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Just Wicked

For Kate Summerscale true crime warrants true accounts of some of Victorian England’s most grisly murders. For Amy Stewart history is a launching pad, a place where real characters’ stories are imagined. In The Wicked Boy, Summerscale tells the story of a woman murdered by her sons. In the Kopp

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Wedding Bush Road

A young lawyer returns to the family farm only to discover his mother in poor health, his father off the property, and his father’s former mistress alone with her son in a small cabin. Celebrated novelist David Francis’ new novel, Wedding Bush Road, presents a haunting portrait of an Australian

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Hard Boiled

In the tradition of Raymond Chandler and James Ellroy, Adrian McKinty and Ben Sanders take up the noble tradition of hard-boiled crime. With his character Sean Duffy, McKinty takes us back to Belfast in the 1980s. With Marshall Grade, Ben Sanders has created an ex-cop negotiating the dark underbelly

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Impossible Journeys

In I Confess and Leila’s Secret, physician, translator and writer Kooshyar Karimi has explored his experiences as a refugee and a doctor in Iran. With his new memoir, Journey of a Thousand Storms, Karimi takes us back to Tehran, to the time when he was kidnapped, jailed, tortured and forced to spy

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Listen, Liberal

American journalist, historian and political analyst Thomas Frank comes to Adelaide with Listen, Liberal, a sobering account of the failures of the American Left, and in particular how the Democratic Party failed to address income inequality. This failure saw itself played out in Brexit and the US e

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North

In Peter Geye’s Wintering a father and son head into the Minnesota winter by canoe, a journey once taken by 19th century explorers. In Ian McGuire’s The North Water a 19th century whaling ship heads to the Arctic in search of prey. Neither journey is as it seems and just about everyone is in dan

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The Muse

The author of the bestseller The Miniaturist returns with The Muse, a novel that tells the story of two women: a Caribbean immigrant living in 1960s London and a bohemian in 1930s Spain. At the heart of the novel is a painting with a secret history, rediscovered by chance. The story that surrounds t

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George Washington

With the publication of his debut collection, The Late Parade, Adam Fitzgerald was heralded as an important new poet. His second volume, George Washington, cements this reputation. In this new book Fitzgerald re-thinks American myths from the founding fathers to Darth Vader. He is concerned with mem

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The Wicked Boy

Kate Summerscale has won every major award for her non-fiction, including the Samuel Johnson Prize for The Suspicions of Mr Whicher. Most recently she has published The Wicked Boy, a gripping account of the murder of a woman in Victorian England by her young sons. Summerscale’s account is both an

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Magic Object

An Art Gallery of South Australia exhibition in partnership with Samstag Museum of Art, UniSA Curated by Lisa Slade Every artist is a conjuror Titled Magic Object and presented by the Art Gallery of South Australia, the 2016 Adelaide Biennial takes its cue from the Wunderkammer to present work

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Books & Reading

There are few things more enjoyable than reading books about books and reading. This session brings together one of the great writers about reading, Alberto Manguel, with one of the great writers about book history, Keith Houston. It will be a celebration of the object that perhaps most defines our

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Vernissage Weekend

Wunderkammer: A weekend of ideas, wonder and revelation Join us for the ‘new’ Artists’ Week The Vernissage weekend of the 2016 Adelaide Biennial welcomes you to a 'Wunderkammer' of perspectives on material and magical thinking, as artists and thinkers examine the juxtapositions that make the

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Boo!

Aboriginal ghost stories and other scary matter Australia has a thriving imported heritage of nursery rhymes, fables, Halloween celebrations and Day of the Dead, but spooky spirits are also located within Aboriginal cultures. Mamu (Pitjantjatjara), Mulyawongk (Ngarrindjeri), and Jerrewarrah (Bun

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One Hundred Letters Home

Celebrated poet Adam Aitken has recently published a remarkable memoir. One Hundred Letters Home uses photographs, conversations and letters to create a narrative of Aitken’s parents’ marriage; a portrait of his father and an account of his own journey from Australia back to his mother’s Thail

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Heart Beat

Lisa Roet is renowned for her exploration of the complex ape-human intersection. Heart Beat is a groundbreaking immersive 4D video installation that uses the mutations of Roet’s own body to examine how cutting-edge scientific technology affects ‘humanness’. With a hint of freak show

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The Critics

In The Dead Ladies Project, Bookslut creator Jessa Crispin chronicles a journey she took through Europe and an exploration of exile through the writings of the dead. In The Art of Rivalry, Pulitzer-prize winning art critic Sebastian Smee tells the stories of the tempestuous relationships between art

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Backyard Cricket

The Rules of Backyard Cricket opens with Darren Keefe in the boot of a car, gagged, shot and hog-tied. Like his brother, Darren Keefe plays cricket, only unlike his brother he can’t seem to keep away from trouble. His is a story of sport, celebrity and one determined woman making a life for her so

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Do Not Say We Have Nothing

Madeleine Thien returns to Adelaide with her multi-award winning novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing. Set in both contemporary Canada and Revolutionary China, the novel tells the story of three gifted musicians and their families. Thien’s novel is a powerful evocation of an era and a richly imagined

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His Bloody Project

Originally published by a small Scottish publisher, His Bloody Project became one of the year’s most celebrated novels. Set in a remote village in the 19th century, the novel is told through testimonials, including that by a 17-year-old crofter awaiting trial for three bloody murders. Its author G

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The Fortunes

Peter Ho Davies is an award-winning novelist and short story writer. His collections include The Ugliest House in the World, Equal Love and the novels The Welsh Girl and most recently The Fortunes. With this brilliant book Davies asks what it means to be Chinese-American. Told in four parts, the nov

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Neil Finn

When accepting an award for ‘Greatest Living Songwriter’, Paul McCartney famously said “I think you mean Neil Finn”. Now one of the world’s finest songwriter returns to Adelaide Festival for what promises to be an unforgettable twilight concert on the Adelaide Riverbank. From his car

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Poetry Reading

Adelaide Writers’ Week has long been committed to supporting Australian poets. This year Peter Goldsworthy has curated a reading by a diverse range of South Australian poets. The session brings together senior poets Cath Kenneally and Jan Owen along with Steve Brock, Jules Leigh Koch, Louise Nicho

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Refugees

There is perhaps no issue more vexatious here in Australia than the treatment of refugees. This session brings together distinguished lawyer and scholar William Maley, author of What is a Refugee? and Adele Dumont, author of No Man is an Island, an account of her time spent teaching on Christmas Isl

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The Book

Keith Houston’s fascination with punctuation and typography resulted in both a wonderful blog and book, Shady Characters. Houston’s history of typography reaches back two millennia to the library at Alexandria and carries on until today. More recently he has published The Book, a beautiful objec

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Days Without End

Poet, novelist and playwright, Sebastian Barry is one of our finest writers. Barry comes to Adelaide with the new novel, Days Without End. The novel tells the story of Thomas McNulty, who having fled the Great Famine in Ireland joins the US Army in the 1850s. With his companion John Cole, Thomas fig

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A Whistled Bit of Bop

Poet, art critic, editor and publisher, Ken Bolton is one of Australia’s most important poets. His recent collections include A Whistled Bit of Bop, Sly Mongoose, and The Circus, among others. Bolton’s poetry is an often laconic and discursive mix of observations about his life and musings on th

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Queen Victoria

With Victoria: The Woman Who Made the Modern World journalist, broadcaster and historian Julia Baird has written a brilliant biography of a real woman who became a great ruler. An absolute pageturner, her Victoria is playful, powerful, passionate, and often misrepresented, in no small part because h

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Political Fictions

In his novel Beauty is a Wound Eka Kurniawan tells the story of Indonesia from the Second World War until the present through the life of a sex worker. In Do Not Say We Have Nothing, Madeleine Thien uses a family’s story to take readers from the Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square. In The Fort

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Bookslut

Creator of the online literary magazine Bookslut, Jessa Crispin is the author of The Dead Ladies Project, a brilliant book about the journey she made travelling in Europe following in the wake of writers she admired. Her most recent book is Why I Am Not a Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto, an utterly f

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The Border

In Yuri Herrera’s novel Signs Preceding the End of the World, a young Mexican woman is sent over the border into the US in search of her brother. Krys Lee’s novel How I Became A North Korean tells the story of two young dissidents who find themselves stranded on the Chinese side of the Korean bo

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On Grief

In Emily Maguire’s An Isolated Incident, a woman loses her sister to a brutal murder. In A S Patric’s Black Rock White City an immigrant couple settle in Australia after losing their two young children in a refugee camp. In both novels the characters are negotiating loss and its aftermath, tryin

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My Documents

Alejandro Zambra is one of the superstars of contemporary fiction. The Chilean novelist and short story writer has most recently seen the story collection My Documents and the novel Multiple Choice translated into English. Zambra’s writing is wonderfully clever, as he plays with identity, memory,

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Heroes

These are the stories not told on the six o’clock news: the stories of those who dwell in dangerous places. In The Way to the Spring Ben Ehrenreich explores the lives of Palestinians living in the West Bank. In One Child Mei Fong talks to those whose lives have been shaped by China’s One Child p

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Syria

There is arguably no place as little understood as Syria. This session brings together two journalists who have covered the Middle East for decades. Patrick Cockburn covers the conflict for The Independent and has recently published The Rise of Islamic State. Janine di Giovanni is the Middle East Ed

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Marshall's Law

From New Zealand Ben Sanders has become a big name in American crime. He is the creator of Marshall Grade, a former undercover cop now reluctantly in witness protection. Marshall first appears in American Blood, a hardscrabble journey through the drug trade. In Marshall’s Law, he is on the run fro

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The Hero Maker

Novelist, historian and biographer Stephen Dando-Collins comes to Adelaide with his recent biography of Paul Brickhill, The Hero Maker. Brickhill was the author of the bestselling war dramas, The Dam Busters and The Great Escape. And his life was much like his fiction - flying Spitfires, getting sho

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The Art of Rivalry

Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic Sebastian Smee is the author of the books Lucian Freud, Side by Side: Picasso v Matisse, and most recently The Art of Rivalry, a fascinating account of the fraught relationships between Matisse and Picasso, de Kooning and Pollock, Freud and Bacon, and Degas and Mane

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The Biographers

With her recent biography Victoria, Julia Baird has uncovered new material and a new perspective as she reveals a Queen who is also a mother, a wife, a daughter and a leader. In Kick, Paula Byrne recovers the story of JFK’s baby sister, the glamour girl who found herself in England at the onset of

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The North Water

A 19th century whaling ship sets out for the Arctic, carrying the harpooner Henry Drax, a nasty drunk who is extremely violent. The ship’s surgeon is the disgraced Patrick Summer just returned from India. In the cold dark of the Arctic, shadowy motives begin to appear as the men battle themselves

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The Lauras

Set on a group of small islands off the coast of Virginia, The Shore, Sara Taylor’s debut novel, is Southern Gothic at its very best: abandoned babies, adrug-addled Daddy, wild ponies, witchcraft, murder, and a half-formed man. Her follow-up, The Lauras, is an unexpected road trip, one that sees a

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Griffith Review

South Australia has always shaped its own destiny with large doses of vision and optimism. This spirit is needed now more than ever, as the state teeters on the brink of a severe jobs crisis. Contributors to Griffith Review: State of Hope, Patrick Allington, Amrita Malhi and Tory Shepherd, join co-e

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Shrill

Lindy West is an online sensation, a celebrated broadcaster and a gifted writer. She is the author of Shrill, a brilliantly funny collection of essays on gender politics, including - abortion rape, weight, Internet trolling and accidental activism. She fearlessly writes about her own life, as a shy

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Unspeakable

In her memoir All At Sea Decca Aitkenhead tells the story of the death by drowning of her husband and her year of mourning. In South of Forgiveness Thordis Elva and Thomas Stranger explore the legacies of an act of sexual violence in an effort to find forgiveness. Both books are extraordinary for th

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War Correspondent

Janine di Giovanni is the Middle East Editor of Newsweek and winner of the 2016 Courage in Journalism Award for her work in Syria. In The Morning They Came for Us, she offers readers series of portraits of real people affected by the conflict including mothers, doctors, students, and prisoners, as w

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The Transmigration of bodies

Yuri Herrera is one of the most exciting voices in contemporary literature. His insanely clever novels include The Transmigration of Bodies, a brilliantly brutal story about a plague bringing death to a city held hostage by two crime families. In Signs Preceding the End of the World, he writes a lyr

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One Child

Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Mei Fong has written a fascinating account of China’s failed attempt at social engineering. In One Child Mei Fong documents the human impact as she travels across China meeting the people who live with the often-brutal consequences of three decades of social contr

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Migrant Nation

Today there are more than a million temporary migrants living in Australia. In Not Quite Australian award-winning journalist Peter Mares explores the implications of this shift from a settler society to one which is much more complicated. Drawing on studies, interviews and personal stories Mares exp

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When the Music's Over

Crime novelist Peter Robinson is best known for his creation DCI Banks, who most recently appears in Robinson’s When the Music’s Over. This time around Banks is working a 50-year-old cold case, one that features an abusive celebrity entertainer and a host of victims. At the same time a 14-year-o

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Left Behind

Thomas Frank’s recent book, Listen, Liberal, documents the failures of the Democratic Party in the US, and in particular how the party lost touch with working class people. No Way But This: In Search of Paul Robeson is Australian journalist Jeff Sparrow's new book, an exploration of the career of

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The Belltree Trilogy

With Slaughter Park, award-winning crime writer Barry Maitland has completed his Belltree Trilogy, which began with Crucifixion Creek and Ash Island. All featuring homicide detective Harry Belltree. Like its predecessors, this instalment relies on moral ambiguity and non-stop action as Harry looks i

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All at Sea

While on holiday in Jamaica, Decca Aitkenhead’s husband Tony drowned while saving their young son. Her powerful memoir All At Sea is an account of that terrible day and the months that followed as she grieved his loss and cared for her young sons. It is also very much a book about Tony, a charisma

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Magical Places

Hannah Kent’s The Good People takes place in 19th century Ireland populated with those who trust in fairies and traditional healers. In Sara Taylor’s The Shore women appear as witches and healers both in the past and into the future. In both novels these traditional women’s worlds are viewed w

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Art, Life & the Other Thing

With his biography Brett Whiteley, correspondent and critic Ashleigh Wilson has brought to life one of contemporary art’s most enigmatic figures. His is the story of a one-time bohemian, celebrated artist, addict, husband and friend. While researching the book Wilson had unprecedented access to th

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Beauty is a Wound

Celebrated Indonesian novelist Eka Kurniawan comes to Adelaide with Beauty is a Wound, an epic account of the beautiful sex worker Dewi Ayu and her four daughters as they negotiate incest, murder, insanity, and the vengeful un-dead. In contrast, Man Tiger is a slender novel that tells the story of t

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Where the Trees Were

Inga Simpson is the author of the novels Mr Wigg, Nest, and most recently Where the Trees Were. This new novel tells the story of Jayne, a girl who grew up on a farm and later becomes a museum curator. As the novel moves from past to present we discover that Jayne’s life is bound by the discovery

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The Gut

Giulia Enders’ Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ is a revolutionary book -an informative and often entertaining tour of our digestive systems, from our lips to our bottoms. Drawing on cutting edge science, Enders explains everything from the good bacteria for gut health t

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Islands

The 60th parallel circles the globe linking Finland, Norway, Greenland, Russia, Canada and finally Shetland, home of travel writer Malachy Tallack, whose book 60 Degrees North is an account of his journey around the world in search of home. His new book The Un-Discovered Islands, explores lands that

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Forgiveness

When Thordis Elva from Iceland was 16 her then-boyfriend, 18-year-old Australian exchange student Tom Stranger, raped her. Many years later, and after a correspondence of eight years, they met in Cape Town, South Africa to reconcile their pasts. South of Forgiveness is an incredible collaboration; w

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On Love and Violence

In Emily Maguire’s powerful novel, An Isolated Incident, a young woman goes missing, leaving her grieving sister determined to discover her attacker. In Zoë Morrison’s heartbreaking Music and Freedom, a young Australian pianist marries a seemingly gentle man in 1950s Oxford. Together these two

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Out Bush

Some of the myths of the outback are undone as these two writers explore desert places. In Lia Hills’ novel The Crying Place, a young white man goes looking for a friend who has died after returning from working in a remote Aboriginal community. In her memoir Position Doubtful, artist and writer K

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Political Histories

Poet, activist, satirist and social commentator Anita Heiss is most recently the author of the novel Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms, the story of a Japanese soldier escaping from an internment camp in Queensland in 1944. The novel tells the story of Hiroshi and the Aboriginal family that shelter hi

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Ghost Empire

In 2014 Richard Fidler and his son made a trip to Istanbul. The trip provoked a wonderful history of the Byzantine Empire and the legendary city Constantinople that is intertwined with a carefully observed journey between a father and a son. Together the two stories see lust, revenge and murder play

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Shame The Devil

Celebrated Young Adult writer Melina Marchetta comes to Adelaide with her first book for adults, the literary thriller Tell The Truth, Shame the Devil. Set in London, the novel tells the story of Bish Ortley, a suspended cop who has just learned that the bus his daughter is on in Calais has been bom

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The Hazel Rowley Lecture

Maxine Beneba Clarke will honour the memory of biographer Hazel Rowley with this memorial lecture. Maxine is the celebrated author of Foreign Soil, her memoir The Hate Race (Hazel Rowley Literary Fellowship winner in 2013 and shortlisted for the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Award), poetry collection C

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ANIMAL

Having created installations for Cartier (2014) and White Night Melbourne (2015), French video virtuosos Antoine et Manuel are expert world builders who have created wondrous landscapes out of light projections that have stunned crowds the world over. In this mesmerizing premiere, Australia’s

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Adelaide Writers' Week 2017

It is a tremendous pleasure to welcome an incredible group of writers for Adelaide Writers’ Week 2017. This March come meet poets, pedants, historians, novelists, biographers, journalists, refugees, feminists, and other courageous souls. This year the idea of borders finds its way through the prog

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Adelaide Writers' Week 2018

It is a thrill to announce the full program of Adelaide Writers’ Week 2018, and all the writers who will gather with us in the Pioneer Women’s Memorial Garden. This year if there is a word we can use to connect the ideas in the program it is “change”, as for good or for ill ours is an unea

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Kids' Weekend 2018

Get ready for big fun at Kids’ Weekend - two magical days of stories, adventures, parades, paintings and performances. The Story Tent This year the story hub of Kids’ Weekend will see an all star line-up featuring

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Kids' Weekend 2017

Get ready for two magical days of stories, parades, painting, printing, performances and lots of full on fun! The Story Tent This year our big red yurt will see some spectacular storytelling including The Underwater Fancy-Dress Parade, The Nose Pixies, The Very Hungry Bum as well as Wild Ideas

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RED

The Art Gallery of South Australia launches the Australian premiere of RED – the directorial debut of del kathryn barton, one of Australia’s leading figurative painters, into short film. del kathryn barton is widely recognised for her distinct aesthetic and enduring obsession with fertility a

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The Ocean After Nature
Countercurrents

The Ocean After Nature and Countercurrents feature the work of 23 Australian and international artists, exploring our relationship with and connections to the oceans through new media, sculpture, installation, painting and photography. Having premiered in New York The Ocean After Nature reflects

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Divided Worlds

Divided Worlds presents an allegory of human society, one that meditates on the drama of the cosmos and evolution; on the past and the future; and on beauty and the environment. Held every two years since 1990, the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art is the country’s longest-standing survey of

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Waqt al-tagheer: Time of change

The War on Terror, the Cronulla riots, dog whistling, children overboard and straight-up threats of violence from radio personalities and politicians alike: the last two decades have been a time of change indeed for people of Muslim faith or background in Australia. The public discourse has fall

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Youssef Nabil: Selected Works

GAGPROJECTS is proud to present selected works by internationally renowned artist, Youssef Nabil in his first solo exhibition in Australia. Nabil is known for his hand coloured photographs and films that evoke nostalgia for Egyptian cinema’s golden age. Nabil shoots intricately arranged black-

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Festival Forums

One of the absolute places to be throughout our 2017 Festival was on The Palais at lunchtime as David Marr interviewed one fabulous Festival artist each day. (People are still talking in shocked tones about that interview with Lars Eidinger, star of Richard III!) With characteristic wit, perspicacit

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Breakfast with Papers

During the Festival, why not start your day with ideas? In the coolest part of the day, at the coolest spot in the city, come and grab a coffee and a pastry and listen to Tom Wright and his panel of informed, smart guests each morning at 8am as they discuss the news of the day and issues of the Zeit

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Closing Night Party

Your final chance to board The Riverbank Palais for 2017, we'll be seeing out this year's Adelaide Festival in style. Bask in the last sunset of the season on the mezzanine bar before kicking up your heels to Lyndon Gray and the Mixed Blessings. Then get down as Triple J's Zan Rowe and House

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Late Night DJs

UPDATE Entry to the Late Night DJ sets will be FREE for the duration of Adelaide Festival 2017 The night doesn’t end when the curtain falls. As the last bow is taken and the last instrument packed away, our line-up of late-night DJs take centre stage. From international headline DJs Nicko

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Festival Forums

You’ve seen the art; now hear the story behind it. Bring your lunch down to the Adelaide Riverbank and experience the free Festival Forums, hosted by one of Australia’s most influential commentators, David Marr. The celebrated author and journalist will chat with a range of festival artist

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Breakfast with Papers

There’s a new home for your favourite morning ritual. We’re opening The Riverbank Palais (nearly) every morning of the Festival for quality coffee and light breakfast from CIBO Espresso paired with lively discussions on current affairs and festival news. Each morning will play host to a fr

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Parc Palais

Overlooking The Riverbank Palais from Elder Park is your hub for the 2017 festival season: Parc Palais. The perfect place for a pre or post show dinner or drink, Parc Palais will be home to free entertainment from local bands and DJs in the rotunda; a recent highlight of the 2017 Sydney Festival

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Nickodemus

Nickodemus started his career with just one idea: music with soul from across the board that would do nothing but make people want to dance and party. Known for his DJ residency at Turntables on the Hudson, this New York City-based DJ/producer boasts a style of music that incorporates everything

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Frank Booker

Frank Booker has quietly built his worldwide reputation for incredible edits and amazing DJ sets over the span of 20 years. From deepest disco, to 80's boogie and cutting edge house music, as well as some super special re-edits, Booker has his focus firmly on the dancers! We dare you not to danc

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Mohair Slim

Melbourne-based DJ, promoter and radio announcer Mohair Slim is an avid collector of rare original 45s in a multitude of styles including rhythm and blues, blues, soul, ska, rocksteady, reggae and cumbia. Catch him serving us some historic African-American and Afro-Caribbean sounds at the Riverbank

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Dr Packer

Dr Packer, best known for his liquid drum & bass sets, doesn’t shy away from all things retro. Get ready for remixes and edits of the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s soul, disco, funk, hip-hop and reggae from the Western Australian DJ/Producer, Greg Packer. Dr Packer has quickly become a mainstay in the se

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Richi Madan

DJ Richi Madan brings the sounds of Bollywood to the floating Palais. A pioneer of the Australian Indian dance scene, Madan organised the first ever Bollywood and Bhangra club nights in Melbourne, introducing a sound Australian audiences have welcomed with open arms. Come along as Richi rocks the bo

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Total Eclipse

One of the first members of the X-Ecutioners, DJ Total Eclipse has helped pioneer turntablism, transcending its status as a mere tool for sound production to becoming a true musical instrument. Come and see Total Eclipse blend, mix, scratch, beat juggle and use his true showmanship to give the River

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Messin Around

A DJ stalwart of the local electronic music movement combines with one of the countries premier producers & record collectors to create the Messin’ Around DJs.DJs Troy J Been and Anth Wendt (Oisima)'s monthly party of the same name throw down everything from hip hop to house, jazz, disco and broke

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